Food Stamps Denials and Appeals

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After a food stamps denial in Arizona, claimants may request a fair hearing (also known as an appeal) if they disagree with the decision made by the Department of Economic Security (DES) regarding eligibility. However, reasons for being denied food stamps may include failure to provide proof of eligibility, not meeting income or resource restrictions or general ineligibility, due to lack of citizenship or state residency status. To appeal a nutrition assistance application denied, however, claimants must request a fair hearing within 90 days of receiving the Nutrition Assistance (NA) determination notice. During the process of how to appeal SNAP benefits denial, the DES may be able to solve the problem during a pre-hearing without the need for a fair hearing. If the DES cannot resolve the SNAP denial during a pre-hearing, however, petitioners will need to report for a fair hearing. For additional information on the food stamps appeal process, download our comprehensive guide. Review more details about food assistance denials in Arizona in the sections outlined below.

What are the reasons for being denied food stamps in Arizona?

After a nutrition assistance application is denied in Arizona, claimants may request a fair hearing if they disagree with the decision. However, reasons for a food stamps denial may pertain to governmental laws or regulations regarding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). If appealing nutrition assistance denial applications, the fair hearing cannot change any laws or regulations that may prevent them from meeting SNAP eligibility requirements. Furthermore, other reasons for being denied food assistance under SNAP may include the following:

  • Difficulty in verifying application information

  • Failure to meet income or resource restrictions

  • Lack of translation during the eligibility interview

  • Fraudulent immigration documents

  • Failure to report for the scheduled eligibility interview

However, reasons for food assistance denials are not related to the applicant’s gender, race, national origin, sexual orientation, marital status or religious or political beliefs, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits this type of discrimination. To learn more about food stamp denials in AZ, download our informative guide.

How do you reopen a food stamp case in Arizona?

After a food stamps denial in Arizona, claimants may disagree with the DES’ determination of their SNAP eligibility. If petitioners disagree with the food assistance denial, they may request a fair hearing (or an appeal) with an authorized official. During the food stamps appeal process, an impartial administrative law judge will review the DES eligibility determination to ensure that the decision meets Arizona law. However, applicants must appeal food assistance denials within a certain amount of time. “When can I apply for food stamps after being denied?” many Arizona residents may wonder. To request a food stamps appeal, petitioners must notify the DES within 90 days of receiving their determination notices.

Furthermore, claimants may reopen a food stamp case for other reasons, as well. For instance, food stamp appeals may also be made if petitioners disagree with their benefit amounts or of the DES fails to determine their eligibility in a timely manner. Additionally, residents may begin the food stamps appeal process if the DES reduces their benefit amounts or ends their assistance for any reason. If appealing a food stamps denial for reasons such as these, claimants may be eligible to continue receiving their NA benefits if they request a fair hearing within 10 days of receiving their determination notices. However, applicants cannot continue their benefits if their applications for assistance were denied by the DES, their approval periods came to an end or they received the maximum allowable amount of benefits under SNAP. To learn more about how to reopen a food stamp case in Arizona, download our comprehensive guide.

How to Appeal SNAP Benefits Denial in Arizona

To appeal a SNAP benefits denial in Arizona, petitioners must obtain applications and submit them to their local DES offices in person, by mail or via fax. To obtain the application for food stamp appeals, claimants may download the form online or they may visit a local DES office to request a form in person. Alternately, Arizona residents may appeal a food stamps denial by submitting a written statement to their local DES offices. However, statements for food assistance appeals must include the following:

  • The applicant’s address

  • The date indicated on the DES notice

  • A reason for the request

After appealing food assistance denials in AZ, petitioners may need to undergo pre-hearing meetings with the DES. If a decision regarding the food stamps denial cannot be made during the pre-hearing, claimants will need to report for a fair hearing. As part of the food assistance appeal process and during the fair hearing, claimants will need to explain to the judge as to why they disagree with the decision made by the DES. During the food stamps appeal process, however, petitioners may choose to hire attorneys to represent them throughout the fair hearing. To learn more about how to appeal SNAP benefit denials in AZ, download our free guide.



What Kind of Assistance Does the Arizona Family Assistance Services Department Offer?

The state of Arizona can assist eligible families with services such as food assistance or temporary cash assistance. To assess your eligibility, you must fill out an application and provide the required documents. To learn all of the details needed to prepare for this application process, download our comprehensive guide today.


Who Is Eligible To Benefit From the Arizona Family Assistance Services?

Eligible low-income families or individuals in Arizona can benefit from programs offered by the Family Assistance Services Department. Temporary financial assistance or Nutrition Assistance services are available to those who qualify upon filing an application. To find out if your family is eligible for these benefits, download our guide now.